Feed on Posts or Comments 22 October 2017

Uncategorized muniroh.adi@smjk.edu.my on 30 Oct 2007

Blog..

What is a “blog”?

“Blog” is an abbreviated version of “weblog,” which is a term used to describe web sites that maintain an ongoing chronicle of information.

A blog is a frequently updated, personal website featuring diary-type commentary and links to articles on other Web sites.

Continue Reading »

Uncategorized muniroh.adi@smjk.edu.my on 30 Oct 2007

Blog..

What is a “blog”?

“Blog” is an abbreviated version of “weblog,” which is a term used to describe web sites that maintain an ongoing chronicle of information. A blog is a frequently updated, personal website featuring diary-type commentary and links to articles on other Web sites. Blogs range from the personal to the political, and can focus on one narrow subject or a whole range of subjects. Many blogs focus on a particular topic, such as web design, home staging, sports, or mobile technology. Some are more eclectic, presenting links to all types of other sites. And others are more like personal journals, presenting the author’s daily life and thoughts. Generally speaking (although there are exceptions), blogs tend to have a few things in common:

  • A main content area with articles listed chronologically, newest on top. Often, the articles are organized into categories.
  • An archive of older articles.
  • A way for people to leave comments about the articles.
  • A list of links to other related sites, sometimes called a “blogroll”.
  • One or more “feeds” like RSS, Atom or RDF files.

Some blogs may have additional features beyond these.

The Blog Content

Content is the raison d’être (http://www.bartleby.com/59/4/raisondetre.html) for any web site. Retail sites feature a catalog of products. University sites contain information about their campuses, curriculum, and faculty. News sites show the latest news stories. For a personal blog, you might have a bunch of observations, or reviews. Without some sort of updated content, there is little reason to visit a web site more than once. On a blog, the content consists of articles (also sometimes called “posts” or “entries”) that the author(s) writes. Yes, some blogs have multiple authors, each writing his/her own articles. Typically, blog authors compose their articles in a web-based interface, built into the blogging system itself. Some blogging systems also support the ability to use stand-alone “weblog client” software, which allows authors to write articles offline and upload them at a later time.

Comments

Want an interactive website? Wouldn’t it be nice if the readers of a website could leave comments, tips or impressions about the site or a specific article? With blogs, they can! Posting comments is one of the most exciting features of blogs. Most blogs have a method to allow visitors to leave comments. There are also nifty ways for authors of other blogs to leave comments without even visiting the blog! Called “pingbacks” or “trackbacks“, they can inform other bloggers whenever they cite an article from another site in their own articles. All this ensures that online conversations can be maintained painlessly among various site users and websites.

The Difference Between a Blog and CMS?

Software that provides a method of managing your website is commonly called a CMS or “Content Management System”. Many blogging software programs are considered a specific type of CMS. They provide the features required to create and maintain a blog, and can make publishing on the Internet as simple as writing an article, giving it a title, and organizing it under (one or more) categories. While some CMS programs offer vast and sophisticated features, a basic blogging tool provides an interface where you can work in an easy and, to some degree, intuitive manner while it handles the logistics involved in making your composition presentable and publicly available. In other words, you get to focus on what you want to write, and the blogging tool takes care of the rest of the site management. WordPress is one such advanced blogging tool and it provides a rich set of features. Through its Administration Panels, you can set options for the behavior and presentation of your weblog. Via these Administration Panels, you can easily compose a blog post, push a button, and be published on the Internet, instantly! WordPress goes to great pains to see that your blog posts look good, the text looks beautiful, and the html code it generates conforms to web standards. If you’re just starting out, read Getting Started with WordPress, which contains information on how to get WordPress set up quickly and effectively, as well as information on performing basic tasks within WordPress, like creating new posts or editing existing ones.

 

Things Bloggers Need to Know

In addition to understanding how your specific blogging software works, such as WordPress, there are some terms and concepts you need to know.

Archives

A blog is also a good way to keep track of articles on a site. A lot of blogs feature an archive based on dates (like a monthly or yearly archive). The front page of a blog may feature a calendar of dates linked to daily archives. Archives can also be based on categories featuring all the articles related to a specific category. It does not stop there; you can also archive your posts by author or alphabetically. The possibilities are endless. This ability to organize and present articles in a composed fashion is much of what makes blogging a popular personal publishing tool.

Feeds

A Feed is a function of special software that allows “Feedreaders” to access a site automatically looking for new content and then post updates about that new content to another site. This provides a way for users to keep up with the latest and hottest information posted on different blogging sites. Some Feeds include RSS (alternately defined as “Rich Site Summary” or “Really Simple Syndication”), Atom or RDF files. Dave Shea, author of the web design weblog Mezzoblue (http://mezzoblue.com) has written a comprehensive summary (http://www.mezzoblue.com/archives/2004/05/19/what_is_rssx/) of feeds.

Blogrolls

A blogroll is a list, sometimes categorized, of links to webpages the author of a blog finds worthwhile or interesting. The links in a blogroll are usually to other blogs with similar interests. The blogroll is often in a “sidebar” on the page or featured as a dedicated separate web page. BlogRolling (http://blogrolling.com) and blo.gs are two websites that provide some interesting functions or help related to blogrolls. These sites provide methods for users to maintain these rolls effortlessly and integrate them into weblogs. WordPress has a built-in Link Manager so users do not have to depend on a third party for creating and managing their blogroll.

 

 

Syndication

A feed is a machine readable (usually XML) content publication that is updated regularly. Many weblogs publish a feed (usually RSS, but also possibly Atom and RDF and so on, as described above). There are tools out there that call themselves “feedreaders”. What they do is they keep checking specified blogs to see if they have been updated, and when the blogs are updated, they display the new post, and a link to it, with an excerpt (or the whole contents) of the post. Each feed contains items that are published over time. When checking a feed, the feedreader is actually looking for new items. New items are automatically discovered and downloaded for you to read. Just so you don’t have to visit all the blogs you are interested in. All you have to do with these feedreaders is to add the link to the RSS feed of all the blogs you are interested in. The feedreader will then inform you when any of the blogs have new posts in them. Most blogs have these “Syndication” feeds available for the readers to use.

 

 

 

Managing Comments

One of the most exciting features of blogging tools are the comments. This highly interactive feature allows users to comment upon article posts and link to your posts and comment on and recommend them. These are known as trackbacks and pingbacks . We’ll also discuss how to moderate and manage comments and how to deal with the annoying trend in “comment spam”, when unwanted comments are posted to your blog.

Trackbacks

Trackbacks were originally developed by SixApart (http://www.sixapart.com/), creators of the MovableType (http://www.movabletype.org/) blog package. SixApart has a good introduction to trackbacks (http://www.movabletype.org/trackback/beginners/): In a nutshell, TrackBack was designed to provide a method of notification between websites: it is a method of person A saying to person B, “This is something you may be interested in.” To do that, person A sends a TrackBack ping to person B. A better explanation is this:

  • Person A writes something on their blog.
  • Person B wants to comment on Person A’s blog, but wants her own readers to see what she had to say, and be able to comment on her own blog
  • Person B posts on her own blog and sends a trackback to Person A’s blog
  • Person A’s blog receives the trackback, and displays it as a comment to the original post. This comment contains a link to Person B’s post

The idea here is that more people are introduced to the conversation (both Person A’s and Person B’s readers can follow links to the other’s post), and that there is a level of authenticity to the trackback comments because they originated from another weblog. Unfortunately, there is no actual verification performed on the incoming trackback, and indeed they can even be faked. Most trackbacks send to Person A only a small portion (called an “excerpt”) of what Person B had to say. This is meant to act as a “teaser”, letting Person A (and his readers) see some of what Person B had to say, and encouraging them all to click over to Person B’s site to read the rest (and possibly comment). Person B’s trackback to Person A’s blog generally gets posted along with all the comments. This means that Person A can edit the contents of the trackback on his own server, which means that the whole idea of “authenticity” isn’t really solved. (Note: Person A can only edit the contents of the trackback on his own site. He cannot edit the post on Person B’s site that sent the trackback.) SixApart has published an official trackback specification (http://www.movabletype.org/docs/mttrackback.html).

Pingbacks

Pingbacks were designed to solve some of the problems that people saw with trackbacks. The official pingback documentation (http://www.hixie.ch/specs/pingback/pingback) makes pingbacks sound an awful lot like trackbacks: For example,
Alice writes an interesting article on her Web log. Bob reads Alice’s article and comments about it, linking back to
Alice’s original post. Using pingback, Bob’s software can automatically notify Alice that her post has been linked to, and
Alice’s software can then include this information on her site.
There are three significant differences between pingbacks and trackbacks, though. 1.   Pingbacks and trackbacks use drastically different communication technologies (XML-RPC and HTTP POST, respectively). 2.   Pingbacks support auto-discovery where the software automatically finds out the links in a post, and automatically tries to pingback those URLs, while trackbacks must be done manually by entering the trackback URL that the trackback should be sent to. 3.   Pingbacks do not send any content. The best way to think about pingbacks is as remote comments:

  • Person A posts something on his blog.
  • Person B posts on her own blog, linking to Person A’s post. This automatically sends a pingback to Person A when both have pingback enabled blogs.
  • Person A’s blog receives the pingback, then automatically goes to Person B’s post to confirm that the pingback did, in fact, originate there.

The pingback is generally displayed on Person A’s blog as simply a link to Person B’s post. In this way, all editorial control over posts rests exclusively with the individual authors (unlike the trackback excerpt, which can be edited by the trackback recipient). The automatic verification process introduces a level of authenticity, making it harder to fake a pingback. Some feel that trackbacks are superior because readers of Person A’s blog can at least see some of what Person B has to say, and then decide if they want to read more (and therefore click over to Person B’s blog). Others feel that pingbacks are superior because they create a verifiable connection between posts.

Verifying Pingbacks and Trackbacks

Comments on blogs are often criticized as lacking authority, since anyone can post anything using any name they like: there’s no verification process to ensure that the person is who they claim to be. Trackbacks and Pingbacks both aim to provide some verification to blog commenting.

Comment Moderation

Comment Moderation is a feature which allows the website owner and author to monitor and control the comments on the different article posts, and can help in tackling comment spam. It lets you moderate comments, & you can delete unwanted comments, approve cool comments and make other decisions about the comments.

Comment Spam

Comment Spam refers to useless comments (or trackbacks, or pingbacks) to posts on a blog. These are often irrelevant to the context value of the post. They can contain one or more links to other websites or domains. Spammers use Comment Spam as a medium to get higher page rank for their domains in Google, so that they can sell those domains at a higher price sometime in future or to obtain a high ranking in search results for an existing website. Spammers are relentless; because there can be substantial money involved, they work hard at their “job.” They even build automated tools (robots) to rapidly submit their spam to the same or multiple weblogs. Many webloggers, especially beginners, sometimes feel overwhelmed by Comment Spam. There are solutions, though, to avoiding Comment Spam. WordPress includes many tools for combating Comment Spam. With a little up front effort, Comment Spam can be manageable, and certainly no reason to give up weblogging.

Pretty Permalinks

Permalinks are the permanent URLs to your individual weblog posts, as well as categories and other lists of weblog postings. A permalink is what another weblogger will use to refer to your article (or section), or how you might send a link to your story in an e-mail message. Because others may link to your individual postings, the URL to that article shouldn’t change. Permalinks are intended to be permanent (valid for a long time). “Pretty” Permalinks is the idea that URLs are frequently visible to the people who click them, and should therefore be crafted in such a way that they make sense, and not be filled with incomprehensible parameters. The best Permalinks are “hackable,” meaning a user might modify the link text in their browser to navigate to another section or listing of the weblog. For example, this is how the default Permalink to a story might look in a default WordPress installation: /index.php?p=423 How is a user to know what “p” represents? Where did the number 423 come from? In contrast, here is a well-structured, “Pretty” Permalink which could link to the same article, once the installation is configured to modify permalinks: /archives/2003/05/23/my-cheese-sandwich/ One can easily guess that the Permalink includes the date of the posting, and the title, just by looking at the URL. One might also guess that hacking the URL to be /archives/2003/05/ would get a list of all the postings from May of 2003. Pretty (cool). For more information on possible Permalink patterns in WordPress, see Using Permalinks.

Link Manager

The Link Manager is the place where you can manage all your links to other websites, blogs, etc. You can create different categories here in which you can place links pointing to other websites or blogs. These websites or blogs can be those which you regularly visit or which are cool, or with whom you are exchanging links or those who’ve paid you to place their links on your BLOG. 😉

Blog by email

Some blogging tools offer the ability to email your posts (http://wiki.wordpress.org/?pagename=How%20To%20Blog%20By%20Email) directly to your blog, all without direct interaction through the blogging tool interface. WordPress offers this cool feature. Using email, you can now send in your post content to a pre-determined email address & voila! Your post is published!

Post Slugs

If you’re using Pretty Permalinks, the Post Slug is the title of your article post within the link. The blogging tool software may simplify or truncate your title into a more appropriate form for using as a link. A title such as “I’ll Make A Wish” might be truncated to “ill-make-a-wish”. In WordPress, you can change the Post Slug to something else, like “make-a-wish”, which sounds better than a wish made when sick.

Excerpt

Excerpts are condensed summaries of your blog posts, with blogging tools being able to handle these in various ways. In WordPress, Excerpts can be specifically written to summarize the post, or generated automatically by using the first few paragraphs of a post or using the post up to a specific point, assigned by you.

Plugins

Plugins are cool bits of programming scripts that add additional functionality to your blog. These are often features which either enhance already available features or add them to your site. WordPress offers simple and easy ways of adding Plugins to your blog. From the Administraton Panel, there is a Plugin Page. Once you have uploaded a Plugin to your WordPress plugin directory, activate it from the Plugins Management SubPanel, and sit back and watch your Plugin work. Not all Plugins are so easily installed, but WordPress Plugin authors and developers make the process as easy as possible.

 

 

Basics-A Few Blogging Tips

Starting a new blog is difficult and this can put many people off, there are then other people who have blogs with no comments or visits. You want to stand out from this crowd of millions of bloggers, you want to be one of the few hundred thousand blogs that are actually visited. So here are some simple tips to help you on your way to blogging mastery: 1:Post regularly, but don’t post if you have nothing worth posting about. 2:Stick with only a few specific genres to talk about. 3:Don’t put ‘subscribe’ and ‘vote me’ links all over the front page until you have people that like your blog enough to ignore them (they’re usually just in the way). 4:Use a clean and simple theme if at all possible. 5:Enjoy, blog for fun, comment on other peoples’ blogs (as they normally visit back).

You’re Ready to Blog

Now that you have the basics, you are ready to blog. For more information on how to blog with WordPress:

“WordPress was born out of a desire for an elegant, well-architectured personal publishing system built on PHP and MySQL and licensed under the GPL. It is the official successor of b2/cafelog. WordPress is fresh software, but its roots and development go back to 2001. It is a mature and stable product. We hope by focusing on web standards and user experience we can create a tool different from anything else out there.” WordPress About Page (http://wordpress.org/about/)WordPress is publishing software with a focus on ease of use, speed and a great user experience. WordPress is blessed with an active community, which is the heart of open source software.

Table of contents showTocToggle(“show”,”hide”) [showhide]
1 Features2 License and Platform3 Managing and Administering the Weblog4 Publicizing Your Work5 Customizing the Design6 Creating Content7 Archives and Search8 Discussion and Comments9 Creating and Managing a Blogroll

Features

WordPress is a powerful personal publishing platform, and it comes with a great set of features designed to make your experience as a publisher on the Internet as easy, pleasant and appealing as possible. We are proud to offer you a freely distributed, standards-compliant, fast, light and free personal publishing platform, with sensible default settings and features, and an extremely customizable core.

License and Platform

  • License : WordPress is licensed under the GPL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html).
  • Platform : PHP (http://php.net) (v4.2 or newer) and MySQL (http://mysql.com)(v3.23.x or newer) are required.

Managing and Administering the Weblog

Locally Installed WordPress is designed to be installed on your own web server, or shared hosting account, which gives you complete control over the weblog. Unlike third-party hosted services, you can be sure of being able to access and modify everything related to your weblog, in case you need to. This also means that you can install WordPress on your desktop or home computer, or even on an Intranet. Portable Core You can choose to have the tree of wordpress related files, which form the back-end of your publicly displayed weblog, be in the same directory as the weblog or in a different directory. For example, if you want your weblog at http://example.com (public_html – the public “root” of your webserver or hosting account) and you want to store the wordpress related files and directory tree in http://example.com/wordpress (public_html/wordpress), you can! UTC friendly WordPress allows you to define your time as an offset from Universal Coordinated Time (UTC), so that all the time-related elements stored in the database are stored as GMT values, which is a universal standard. Among other things, this helps you display the correct time on your weblog, even if your host server is located in a different time zone. gzip enabled You can save some bandwidth by turning on the gzip option in your WordPress install. WordPress gzips content when the readers’ browser supports it. This requires the mod_gzip module to be enabled in your Apache server installation. User management WordPress uses user-levels to control user-access to different features, so you can restrict the ability of individual users to create or modify content in your weblog, by changing their user-level. User profiles Each user on your weblog can define a profile, with details such as their email address, instant messaging aliases etc, if they want to. Users can also control the way in which their details are displayed on the weblog. Easy installation and upgrade WordPress’ famous 5 minute install can’t be beaten for simplicity and ease of use. Upgrading your weblog to the latest version of WordPress is easy, too, and it should take less time than the installation! Dynamic page generation No rebuilding of all your pages each time you update your weblog, or any aspect of it. All pages are generated using the database and the templates each time a page from your weblog is requested by a viewer. This means that updating your weblog, or its design is as fast as possible, and required server storage space usage is minimal. Internationalization and Localization You can now create a weblog that is localized to your choice, and delivered in a language of your choice. The gettext (http://www.gnu.org/software/gettext/) method is used to translate and localize WordPress to the fullest extent.

Publicizing Your Work

Feeds The RSS 1.0 (aka RDF) (http://purl.org/rss/1.0/), RSS 2.0 (http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss) and ATOM (http://www.atomenabled.org/developers/syndication/atom-format-spec.php) specifications are fully supported by WordPress, and what’s more, just about any page on your weblog has an associated feed that your readers can subscribe to – there’s a feed for the latest posts, for categories, comments, well, like we said earlier, for anything you want. The more options your readers have to keep track of different sections of your weblog, the easier it is for you to spread the word around the world. WordPress also fully supports RSS 2.0 with enclosures, so adding mp3 files (such as podcasts) to your RSS feeds is a snap. Cruft-free Permalinks The URLs for all the pages in your weblog can be made to conform to a standard, cruft-free system, and all the links are structured, sensible, and understable to human and machines, and that includes search engines. Clean URLs are essential for search engine optimization and an improved user experience. Inter-blog Communication In an increasingly connected world, WordPress comes ready for PingBack (http://www.hixie.ch/specs/pingback/pingback) and TrackBack (http://www.movabletype.org/docs/mttrackback.html), two very useful ways of connecting to other weblogs, and to enable them to do the same.

Customizing the Design

Template Driven Design WordPress uses templates to generate the pages dynamically. You can control the presentation of content by editing the templates using the Template Editor tool and the Template Tags Template and File Editor Every installation of WordPress comes with a file editor you can use to edit your templates and other WordPress related files, right in your browser without having to worry about downloading and uploading the files in order to edit them. Template Tags Template tags make it easier to design the content and information displayed on your weblog. You don’t need to be a PHP whiz to design your weblog. Themes You can skin your weblog using readily available themes, or styles. You can also create and share your own themes. Plugins Plugins extend the core functionality of your weblog. A large number of user-developed plugins are already available and can be used to do virtually anything you want to, with your blog.

Creating Content

Password protection So you want to share something with some people, but not everyone? Easy, protect the article in question with a password. Post Slug If you are using clean PermaLinks on your website, you can define the link to an individual post by using a post-slug. Post to the future You can write a post today and have it appear on the weblog at a future date, automatically. Multi paged posts If your post is too long, cut it up into pages, so your readers don’t have to scroll to the end of the world. File/picture uploading You can upload pictures or files, and link to them or display them in your articles. You have the option of creating thumbnails of pictures when you upload them. Categories Organize your posts into categories, and sub-categories, and sub-sub categories… Emoticons WordPress is smart enough to convert character smileys, like “:)” into the graphical image counterparts. Save Drafts Save your unfinished articles, improve them later, publish when you’re done. Previewing Posts Before you press the “Publish” button, you can look at the preview for the article you just wrote to check if everything is the way you want it. In fact, you can do that at any time, since the preview is “live”. Desktop Tools You don’t have to use a browser to update your weblog, you can use any desktop blogging tool that supports the MetaWeblog (http://www.xmlrpc.com/metaWeblogApi) or Blogger (http://www.blogger.com/developers/api/1_docs/) API. Blog by email You can send your posts as an email and have them appear on the weblog. Bookmarklets Add the “Press It!” bookmarklet provided by WordPress to your browser and you have a shortcut to create an article with a link to the page currently displayed on your browser! Sidebar If you don’t like a bookmarklet, use our friendly browser sidebar, which can be used in a similar fashion. Formatting Think of WordPress as something that makes your words smoother, and your pages more appealing. WordPress ships with text-formatting plugins that clean up your content and add typographic goodness to your articles.

Archives and Search

Archiving After you’ve been blogging for an extended period of time, what matters is how well your posts are organized, and for that, WordPress provides you with several ready made options to display the archives of your blog, containing all the old posts. You can choose from yearly, monthly, weekly, daily, category-wise or author-wise archives, and easily link to the archive pages from the main page (or any other page) of your blog, using a template tag to generate the links to these archive pages. Since WordPress generates pages dynamically, all these archive pages come at no additional space-cost to your server. Searching WordPress has a functional built-in search tool, which allows visitors to your blog to search for terms they are interested in, and the search-hilite plugin that ships with WordPress can highlight their search terms, so it is even easier for them to find what they were searching for. In addition to this, the plugin also does the same for someone who arrives at your blog by clicking at a search result in a search engine, such as google. All in all, searching is fun, with WordPress.

Discussion and Comments

Community
Building
 WP is not the YMCA, but it does help build communities around weblogs, through the use of comments, trackbacks and pingbacks, helping you keep in touch with the audience and fostering friendship Allowed html tagsNot everyone is evil, but keep those who are in check by limiting which html tags are kosher on your weblog. The default html tags allowed by WordPress are a sane choice to let people use html in their comments, without compromising the safety of your data or server. Moderation For the control freak in all of us, WordPress provides an array of moderation options. You can moderate ·         all comments before they appear on the blog ·         comments with specific words in them ·         comments posted from specific IP addresses ·         comments containing more than some specified number of links. All these moderation options keep spammers and vandals in check. Notification WordPress can keep you in the loop by sending you an email each time there is a new comment or a comment awaiting moderation.

Creating and Managing a Blogroll

Blogroll The blogroll is where you link to the blogs you read frequently – a friendly way of acknowledging the good blogs out there. WordPress’ built-in Links Manager allows you to add and manage links effortlessly Bookmarklet The effortlessness begins with a neat bookmarklet that you can add to the bookmarks or favourites in your browser. Adding a link to an interesting blog or website is as simple as clicking on the bookmark or favourite when you visit the blog or website the next time! Categorizing The links in your blogroll can be categorized and neatly organized Importing If you already have a list o’ links as an OPML file, you can import it to your WordPress blog. For those coming from other blogging tools, this means that you can import your blogroll from Blogrolling.com (http://blogrolling.com) and never use a third-party service to manage your blogroll, again. Exporting Did we say you can also export an OPML file with your list o’ links? Displaying As with everything else, you get some neat template tags that enable you to display your blogroll the way you like – in alphabetical order, ranking order, the order in which they were updated – you get the idea  

Uncategorized muniroh.adi@smjk.edu.my on 30 Oct 2007

Blog

What is a “blog”?

“Blog” is an abbreviated version of “weblog,” which is a term used to describe web sites that maintain an ongoing chronicle of information.

A blog is a frequently updated, personal website featuring diary-type commentary and links to articles on other Web sites.

Continue Reading »

Malaysia &Penan muniroh.adi@smjk.edu.my on 30 Oct 2007

One school uniform for a whole week

http://www.malaysia-today.net/blog2006/newsncom.php?itemid=8351

 

19/09: One school uniform for a whole week

Category: General

Posted by: Raja Petra

Borneo Post

Penan student lives with bare necessities at boarding school; some stop studying due to ‘hurtful’ teasing

KUCHING: Every school day, 13-year-old Wendy Musa wears the same uniform which she washes once a week.

Even if it smells, she still has to wear it till Friday afternoon before she can do her laundry.

This is because she has no spare and her single mother cannot afford to buy her another.

This Penan girl from Ba’ Abang, Ulu Baram, Miri Division, aspires to be a teacher but is uncertain of her future because she doesn’t know how long her mother can continue supporting her in secondary school.

Continue Reading »